• baby in graduation cap

    Posted on 5/23/2019 by Andrea Pavlik, C.O., Cfm

     

    You just brought your perfect little bundle of joy home and are eagerly looking forward to watching them grow. A few months go by and you notice that their head shape is flat on one side. Why is this? Is it natural? Should you be concerned?

    In 1992, the American Association of Pediatrics launched its most successful program ever: the “Back to Sleep” campaign, which served to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). SIDS, also known as crib death, is the sudden, unexplained and leading cause of death in children from one moth to one year of age. The campaign encouraged parents to put their babies to sleep on their backs, helping to reduce SIDS by more than 40 percent.

    However, the “Back to Sleep” campaign had a now recognized unintended consequence: plagiocephaly, or flat head syndrome. Plagiocephaly is characterized by the development of a flat spot on the back or side of the head. A baby’s head is very soft, and they spend excessive time laying on their backs while in cribs, beds, bouncers, car seats, high chairs, etc. This leads to an increase in the number of infants who acquire skull deformities.

    Why do babies’ heads deform?

    Plasticity of newborns skull make is susceptible to external pressures
    Immobility of newborns
    Abnormalities to the skull present at birth
    What are contributing risk factors?

    Prolonged positioning on their backs and back of head
    Lack of tummy time
    Multiple birth infants
    Neck weakness
    Is this serious?

    It is perfectly normal for newborns to have abnormal head shapes; however, they should resolve within a few weeks.
    If flat spots are still apparent, some help may be needed to correct the problem.
    Do a simple test by looking at your baby’s head and comparing to the chart below.
    To be sure of the normalcy of your baby’s head shape, consult your physician.
    Plagiocephaly Chart

    It is fixable? Absolutely! There are several treatment options to help correct the flat spot.

    Let nature take her course: Many minor flat spots will resolve on their own as the child ages, but try to keep your baby off their backs as much as possible by engaging in some quality tummy time.
    Tummy time: This can be done starting from the day you bring your baby home from the hospital. Tummy time is simply that: placing your child, while supervised, on their tummy or side. This can include while being carried, diapering, feeding and playing. Please check out this tummy time guide.
    STARband: By using a plastic helmet that is worn for 23 hours per day, your baby’s head is gently guided into a more normal shape. Please consult your physician and/or orthotist for more detailed information.
    NovaCare Prosthetics & Orthotics offers complimentary consultations for cranial remolding helmets in many of our locations, courtesy of our certified cranial remolding specialists and orthotists. Our team will educate you on repositioning techniques, plagiocephaly and protocols for the device your child may use. Over the course of treatment, we can adjust the custom-fit helmet as the baby’s head improves.

    For more information or to schedule your complimentary consultation, please contact a NovaCare Prosthetics & Orthotics center near you  

    The cutie pictured above is one of our cranial remolding graduates, Arvy Roberts.

    By: Andrea Pavlik, C.O., Cfm. Andrea is a certified orthotist with NovaCare Prosthetics & Orthotics in Sheboygan, WI.

    We have the same overall goals: obtaining outcomes and delivering exceptional patient experiences. In addition, we have sophisticated platforms to effectively partner with you and share data. Experience our compassionate approach and let us - in partnership with you - help your patients heal and get back to work, athletics and daily life.

    Refer a patient to our therapy team.

  • spilled pill bottle

    Posted on 4/23/2019 by NovaCare Rehabilitation and Select Physical Therapy

     

    For the management of some types of pain, prescription opioids can certainly help. However, there is not enough evidence to support prolonged opioid use for chronic pain. And, unused or expired prescription medications are a public safety issue that can lead to accidental poisoning, overdose and abuse. If thrown in the trash, unused prescriptions can be retrieved and abused or illegally sold. The misuse and abuse of over-the-counter medications, illicit drugs, alcohol and tobacco affect the health and well-being of millions of Americans.

    With that in mind, mark your calendar for Saturday, April 27, 2019, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time, as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), in partnership with federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement, businesses, medical offices, agencies and first responders, hosts events to collect and safely dispose of unwanted medications.

    Removing unwanted or expired medications from the medicine cabinet is an easy way to make a difference in the opioid crisis. Make plans to dispose of unused and unwanted medications during DEA National Rx Take Back Day at a location near you. 

    And, remember: To achieve pain-free movement for enhanced quality of life and independence, rely on NovaCare Rehabilitation and Select Physical Therapy’s team of extensively trained and licensed therapists. Our clinicians are movement experts who can identify, diagnose and treat your pain or injury and get you back to work, athletics and daily life.

    Working with a physical, occupational and/or certified hand therapist through a plan of care that is designed specifically for your needs is a safer and more effective long-term option than opioid use. Let us help you to experience the power of physical therapy today!

    Side effects include:

    Reduced pain
    Restored function
    Increased strength and flexibility
    Prevention of future injury
    Improved quality of life
    …And much more!
    Medicine dispensed includes:

    Manual therapy
    Aquatic therapy
    Hand/Occupational therapy
    Sports performance
    Work health
    …And much more!
    For more information or to request a complimentary consultation, please contact a center near you today.


     

  • Family doing laundry

    Posted on 4/15/2019 by Karrianna Gallagher, OTD, OTR/L, CHT

     

    Occupational therapist? I already have a job…

    The term ‘occupation’ is more general than what we typically think. Because a third of our day is spent at work, the word ‘occupation’ has taken on that set meaning. This is interesting given that another one third of our day is spent sleeping. So why isn’t sleeping considered an occupation? This is likely because everyone sleeps, and when you think of your occupation you think of something that is uniquely you. But what is uniquely you is actually a collection of occupations, not just the one that takes up the most time. You could be a mom, teacher, gardener, friend, sculptor, chef, etc. These are the roles that you identify with and the occupations that occupy your time.

    Occupations are how we define ourselves and how we experience life. It’s likely that some occupations take up more of your time than others, but that doesn’t mean you identify with them any less. Each of them is part of who you are.

    We live our most fulfilling life when we are able to participate in all of our valued occupations to the fullest extent. Now, imagine breaking your wrist or tearing your rotator cuff. Suddenly you can’t hold your baby, write a grocery list, chop vegetables, press down piano keys, throw a ball or achieve a full night of pain-free sleep (which we all know was already being interrupted by the baby!). Every part of who you are and the way you define yourself as a person is impacted by this injury.

    There are many members of the health care team who will play a part in helping you heal. One of the team members may be an occupational therapist. Occupational therapists have the knowledge of your injury accompanied by the expertise in analyzing the necessary activities in order to guide your rehabilitation program. Their goal is to ensure your range of motion, strength and endurance are restored in the safest, most efficient way so you can get back to fully engaging in all of the occupations you want and need to live your best life.

    Hand therapist? But I tore my rotator cuff…

    A hand therapist is an occupational or physical therapist who has specialized knowledge in the upper limb - shoulders, arms and hands. The anatomy and mechanics of hands and arms is extremely complex and intricately connected, which is why it requires specialization. Think about all of the various movements you use your arms and hands for – turning a door knob, using a fork, tucking in your shirt, etc. Even seemingly simple tasks will be impacted by an injury to the smallest finger bone.

    What’s the difference in a hand therapist who is an occupational therapist and a physical therapist?

    More than 80 percent of certified hand therapists are occupational therapists, the other 20 percent are physical therapists. Both occupational and physical hand therapists have similar goals in terms of helping you heal from injury. The main premise of occupational therapy is the therapeutic use of meaningful occupation as a form of treatment. The idea here is to motivate a person to bend their elbow so they are able to feed themselves. In addition, occupational therapy has its roots in mental health. They can address not only the physical injury, but the emotional components as well.

    So, now you know… occupational therapists don’t help you find jobs and hand therapists don’t just treat hands. Occupational therapists who specialize in hand therapy are creative and caring shoulder, arm and hand experts. They take you on a rehabilitation journey where your ability to return to your unique collection of meaningful occupations is the finish line.

    By: Karrianna Gallagher, OTD, OTR/L, CHT. Karrianna is an occupational therapist and certified hand therapist with NovaCare Rehabilitation in Minnesota. She has experience in rehabilitation non-surgical and surgical shoulder, arm and hand injuries.

  • Industrial Workers

    Posted on 3/25/2019 by Mike Montez, M.S., ATC, CSCS

     

    With an aging workforce, increasing health care costs and a continued demand for physically demanding jobs to be completed by humans, more and more companies are looking into providing their employees with access to an onsite injury prevention specialist.


    The injury prevention specialist role is often filled by a National Athletic Trainers’ Association Board of Certification certified athletic trainer whose unique training, skills and abilities make a great fit for the job. Athletic trainers perform skills including immediate injury triage and care, biomechanics assessment, health and wellness education and strengthening/conditioning of active individuals.

    Onsite athletic trainers work with industrial athletes who might be delivering online purchases, assisting with luggage at the airport or even cleaning a hotel room. The main goal of the industrial athletic trainer is injury prevention. Just like in sports, industrial athletic trainers “keep the worker in the game.”

    Many individuals don’t know when to use ice or heat, how to stretch a tight muscle, basic nutrition needs for a physical job or even how lack of sleep can affect the body’s ability to heal, decrease motor coordination and increase blood pressure. That is where the role of the industrial athletic trainer comes into play.

    Employees suffering a wide array of pain or discomfort from work-related and non-work related activities can seek out care from the onsite injury prevention specialist. Care may include assessing the individual, developing a plan of care and attempting to conservatively manage the issue through a combination of ice, heat, soft tissue massage, prophylactic, non-rigid taping and the application of a topical analgesic.

    More often than not, an employee’s symptoms resolve within a few visits. If not, the industrial athletic trainer will discuss potential next steps in the process which could include following up with a doctor for further treatment. The industrial athletic trainer also serves as a referral source for other available services which may include dentistry, registered dietitians, follow-up with the employee’s primary care physician/specialist or even psychological consults.

    Think of the industrial athletic trainer as a one-stop shop for all your health and wellness needs while on the job. The service is free (paid for by the employer) and is designed to keep the workforce healthy, happy and safe!

    For more information regarding services for the industrial athlete through the Select Medical Outpatient Division’s WorkStrategies Program, please call 866.554.2624 or email [email protected] today.

    By: Mike Montez, M.S., ATC, CSCS, WorkStrategies coordinator for Select Physical Therapy’s Southern California community. He serves as the site supervisor with our OnSite Program at Delta LAX and offers more than 15 years of experience. He is a graduate of Cal State University Long Beach.