• Posted on 7/9/2020

     

    NovaCare Rehabilitation proudly partnered with the Philadelphia 76ers to help local communities remain healthy and safe during the coronavirus pandemic. The two organizations are donating 10,000 masks to areas of need in Philadelphia and Camden, N.J., where the team is headquartered.

    In partnership with the Sixers Youth Foundation, the masks will be donated to Camden Health & Athletic Association, Food Corps, Cathedral Kitchen, Playworks, Salvation Army Krocs Center, LUCY Outreach, Camden County School District, KIPP Schools, Philabundance, Food Bank of South Jersey and Camden County Department of Human Services. These organizations were pre-selected based off demonstrated need and its history with the foundation and NovaCare.

    “We are proud to collaborate with our more than 30-year partner, the Sixers, to provide masks in the communities we serve to promote health, safety and well-being,” said NovaCare Rehabilitation President Dan Bradley. 

    Masks are mandatory in Philadelphia if you’re outside in public areas to help stop the spread of COVID-19, and these stylish masks are branded with each organizations’ marks. 

    “These are communities in need that really don’t have easy access to masks,” said Katie O’Reilly, the Sixers’ chief marketing officer. “Our foundation spends the bulk of its work in the city of Philadelphia and Camden, so they have a great understanding of that. We wanted to help, and obviously so did NovaCare.”

    For more information, please read the full story here.

  • Posted on 3/30/2020

     

    Each March, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) celebrates National Athletic Training Month. This year’s slogan is “ATs Impact Health Care Through Action.”


    Since I became a certified athletic trainer in 1995, I am often posed the question “Why did you choose this profession?” Many times my answer is not only an expression of my own feelings, but a compilation of answers I have heard from the number of interviews I have conducted through my position as regional coordinator for sports medicine.


    As many athletic trainers have, I came from an athletic background. I enjoyed success as a high school athlete, but I was not gifted enough or provided the opportunity to take my talents to the next level. However, my friend invited me to a college career fair at the local university, and a window of opportunity presented itself to me when I learned about athletic training. Following that career fair, I knew this profession would impact me for the rest of my life. I had found a profession that would allow me to maintain my appetite for sports: the competitiveness, the excitement of game day, the ability to be part of a team and, most importantly, the ability to impact every athlete through my actions as a health care provider.


    Oftentimes during the interview process, I hear the response from candidates that the reason they became an athletic trainer was because of the effect their athletic trainer had on them. Whether they sustained an injury in high school or college, they were impacted by their athletic trainer and this profession. No matter the response they give, all athletic trainers possess a number of similar traits, including the innate need to help others.


    Our ability to walk side-by-side with an athlete through their journey from training, prevention, performance, injury, treatment, recovery and return to play is the most unique in the health care field (though I may be biased). As an athletic trainer, our collaboration with all facets of the health care spectrum are unmatched.


    On any given day, we communicate with coaches, parents, school nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, physical therapists, family medical physicians and orthopedic physicians to assist just one athlete. Athletic trainers also impact our workforce community by providing services to industrial athletes in manufacturing, police, fire and rescue, tactical, performing arts, transportation and aerospace, hospital and retail settings. We communicate with their employers, case managers, payers and insurers to help with return to work. In all that we do, our one common goal is to provide quality health care and safety for each athlete, patient and worker we care for.


    For the past 25 years, I have been employed as an athletic trainer, 18 of them for Select Physical Therapy. As a certified and licensed health care professional, my job encompasses the prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of emergent, acute or chronic injuries and medical conditions. I have been on the sidelines for high school, collegiate and professional sports. I have witnessed state championship games, national championship games and individual titles. I have worked in a major automobile factory providing care for employees responsible for assembling the doors on your car or truck. Most recently, I have been given the opportunity to educate, support and mentor other athletic trainers in the field.


    I do what I do because, at the end of each day, I can look back on my work and feel the value and positive effect I have had on an individual’s health, well-being and ability to do what is important to them in that moment – impacting their health care through my actions. What could possibly be better than that?


    By: Perry Siegel, M.S., ATC, CSCS, regional sports medicine coordinator for Select Physical Therapy in Connecticut. Select Physical Therapy and NovaCare Rehabilitation are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

  • Athletic Training Month video

    Posted on 3/5/20 Haley Taffera


    Whether it’s on the athletic field, a job-site or in one of our outpatient centers, our athletic trainers are counted on to be the frontline support for injury prevention, treatment and ongoing management of care for athletes, workers and patients and customers. In honor of National Athletic Training Month, we asked our National Director of Sports Medicine John Gilmour, M.A., ATC, to share how our incredible team of athletic trainers makes an impact in the lives of thousands of people across the country on a daily basis. View the video here...


    Be sure to visit our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages throughout the month of March as we recognize and celebrate our colleagues.


  • Hands with finger sprain

    Posted on 6/4/2019 by Victoria Trueba, MOT, OTR/L, CHT

     

    Finger sprains are very common. They can cause torn ligaments and broken bones even if you don’t see an obvious deformity and are still moving your finger. Earlier treatment allows you to recover faster, identify a more serious injury to your finger and begin the most successful treatment. Whether it’s a basketball player who jammed his middle finger against the ball, an employee late to work who slammed the car door on her finger or a dog leash that became tangled and pulled on a finger, digital trauma is nothing to shake your finger at!Case in point: Mrs. F,  a teacher’s aide working with children with special needs. One particular morning as the class was completing an arts and craft project, Mrs. F went to help a student who was becoming increasingly upset. As she was attempting to help the student, he accidentally grabbed Mrs. F’s finger instead of the crayon. Without thought, Mrs. F pulled away and her middle finger got twisted. She recalls the intense pain and immediate swelling she experienced after the injury; however, she thought the pain would go away on its own and that ice would help with the swelling.As the days went on, Mrs. F’s middle finger was not improving. It remained swollen, tender to the touch and she noticed bending and straightening became more limited. Her grip had been affected, and daily tasks such as grabbing the steering wheel and writing became challenging. Mrs. F remembers thinking, “But it was just a finger sprain!”Our fingers contain three joints, with the most commonly sprained joint being the middle knuckle. Our joints also have many ligaments, which serve as a type of checks and balance system that allows both mobility and stability. When Mrs. F was finally evaluated by an orthopaedic physician four weeks after her injury took place, she was diagnosed with a grade 1 injury to a ligament on the side of her joint – the culprit of her limited mobility. Grade 1 ligament injury is detected when there is localized pain and tenderness over the involved joint, noticeable swelling and possible bruising.Depending on the grade of the strain, different treatment options are available. In Mrs. F’s case, a grade 1 injury is less severe on the scale of 1 to 3. As the severity increases to grade 2 and grade 3, the integrity of the ligament is further injured, which results in a less stable joint and a need for prolonged immobilization. In some cases, these injuries may require surgery.We were able to treat Mrs. F’s grade 1 injury with 7-10 days of immobilization in a custom removable splint for eight weeks. This allowed the swelling to go down and the ligament to begin healing. Afterward, she wore fabric buddy tapes around her index and middle fingers to protect the middle finger from a sideways force. Needless to say, don’t be fooled by a ‘simple’ finger injury! Although Mrs. F had a grade 1 injury, she was still significantly affected in her ability to complete daily activities. By the time she began therapy, she had lost a considerable amount of motion in her finger and had begun finding ways to grip without using her middle finger. Even a low grade strain may require therapy due to stiffness, weakness, swelling and hypersensitivity to touch. Make sure to have an injury evaluated in a timely manner and get the appropriate treatment to avoid deficits in doing the things you love most.

    By: Victoria Trueba, MOT, OTR/L, CHT. Vicky is an occupational therapist and certified hand therapist with Select Physical Therapy in Trinity, FL.