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Power Wellness Blog

  • Occupational Therapy and the ReVital Cancer Rehabilitation Program

    Posted on 4/19/2018 by Inessa Soden, O.T., CHT | Comments

    OT ReVital careOccupational therapy has been an established profession for more than 100 years. Yet, to this day, many people, and even medical professionals, are confused about what this field has to offer. It could be described as one of the disciplines in a rehabilitation team, focusing on restoring people’s ability to perform normal daily activities and resume valued roles in life. Thus, occupational therapy could be applied in general public health and the rehabilitation of many medical diseases.

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment is a devastating life event that throws unexpected hurdles on the road of survivorship. Cancer patients may experience:

    Pain
  • Weakness and fatigue Stiffness in joints Numbness and altered sensation in extremities Difficulty remembering and performing daily activities

Some of these difficulties occur at the time of diagnosis, while others might become apparent during treatment and long after.

Medicine has been making great strides in treating and curing some cancers and better prognoses for life expectancy. There are currently more than 15 million cancer survivors in the United States, and the projected number is more than 20 million in the next… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

Stay Safe and Perform Better - ACL Prevention Program

Posted on 3/27/2018 by Bryce Vorters, M.S., ATC, LAT | Comments

ACLA couple weeks ago, I got the chance to dust off my golf clubs and go to the driving range. I hit 100 golf balls with four different clubs, and all of them went the same distance. I know that isn’t how it’s supposed to work, but hey, I never said I was good at golf. I just have the dream of hitting a hole in one, so I looked up the odds and it is about a one in 3,500 chance. Given that I can’t hit the ball like a pro, or even a good amateur, my dream will probably never happen, but I’m always going to prepare for the day by striking the ball whenever I get a chance.

From an odds standpoint, one in 3,500 is about .02 percent, which is a long shot, but accounts for approximately 100,000 people this year in the United States. These odds are the same as the possibility of tearing your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). For the same reasons I go out year after year and practice hoping for a par, I’d encourage you to make a small effort to work on lowering your chances of tearing an ACL with an ACL prevention program.

ACL prevention programs have been created and mixed into teams warm-ups, cool downs and off-season lift programs and have been shown to be helpful. Research shows 75 to 85 percent less ACL injuries happen when athletes are on an… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

Snow Shoveling Safety

Posted on 3/21/2018 by Dorothy Lehr, DPT, OCS, Cert. MDT | Comments

Snow ShovelingMajor snowstorms have already hit many parts of the country this winter, and the fourth nor'easter in three weeks is currently battering the East Coast, drowning out any hopes of spring. There is lots of fun to be had with the fluffy white powder, but removing snow from sidewalks and driveways is an unenviable chore and one that can cause a plethora of physical problems.

With that in mind, below are a few tips and stretches to keep you safe and healthy while out in the winter wonderland:

Choose an ergonomically correct shovel, one which has a curved handle and an adjustable handle length. As opposed to a straight line shovel, a shovel which is small, lightweight and curved will allow you to carry a manageable load of snow and keep your back straighter, reducing spinal stress. Proper shoveling technique is just as important as the correct shovel. Keep your back straight and bend at your hips and knees. When moving the snow to a new location, avoid twisting your body. Instead, turn your whole body by pivoting your legs. Avoid slipping on slick areas or black ice by wearing shoes or boots with good tread. Applying pet-friendly salt, sand or kitty litter will also increase traction and decrease the risk of slipping. Snow shoveling can… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

High School Concussion Management and Rehabilitation

Posted on 3/16/2018 by Stephanie Wilkins, MSEd, ATC, and Leah Friedland, M.S., ATC | Comments

ATC concussionConcussions are a great concern throughout the world of sport and especially in the high school setting. They can impact the student-athlete not only on the field, but also in the classroom and their daily lives. As athletic trainers in the high school setting, when a concussion has occurred, we are involved in the entire process, including:

Baseline testing Evaluation Diagnosis Follow-up Return-to-play

We help with education, implementation of proper concussion protocols and serve as an advocate for the student-athlete in their sport, classroom and life.

Education – Despite the growing awareness and concern that is present in the media over concussions, we find that coaches, parents and athletes are often still uninformed about the seriousness of concussions and the proper way to handle them. A concussion is a traumatic brain injury that is caused by either a direct force/blow to the head or a force transmitted through the body to the head. As high school athletic trainers, we find ourselves explaining to coaches that “getting your bell rung” is the same as sustaining a concussion, and that it is not something that can be ignored. “This wasn’t a big deal back when… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

Get Moving with a Functional Movement Screen

Posted on 3/8/2018 by Joshua Cramer, DAT, LAT, ATC, CES, CSCS | Comments

FMSInjuries can happen at any time to anyone. Whether playing your favorite sport, working on the job or living your daily life, it’s important to get the proper treatment when an injury occurs, and that starts with the evaluation process.

During an evaluation, a clinician will discuss a patient’s medical history, discuss goals and specific needs, inspect for abnormalities, tenderness or deformities and test musculoskeletal health. All of these components are essential to making a proper diagnosis, but they rarely provide the whole picture. These evaluative techniques focus on the area of the patient’s chief complaint, but what if the issue is in a different region or system in the body?

To design more effective treatments, it is important to look at the body as a whole – the upper and lower body, the front and back of the body and the limbs. This is where postural and functional assessments come into play.

Functional movements are essentials movements found in activities of daily living. They usually involve multi-joint movements in numerous directions, which place demand on the body's core muscles. Our clinical team frequently include functional movement screens in the evaluation process, which are designed to examine these… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy